Second Mate Section 4

DRY DOCKING

CHIEF OFFICER DUTIES

1.         All hatches and beams stowed (to give continuity of strength)

2.         Derrick and cranes down (to counteract roll)

3.         Eliminate free surface

4.         Adequate stability check (adequate GM to counteract the rise in ‘G’ due to ‘P’ force)

5.         Consultation of draft and trim (on advice of the drydock manager)

6.         Sound round all tanks

7.         Security lock-up spaces

8.         Lock-up toilets :

9.         Rig fenders :

10.       Dry-dock plan and shell expansion plans for shore positions

11.       Obtain facilities:- water, power, bonding, access and garbage disposal

12.       Sound round on the blocks

13.       Prepare a repair list (to allow cost/time estimates. Allows officer to monitor and protect owners interest

****DRYPOCK PLAN:- shows underwater appendages, hog, echo sounders; bilge keels, stabilizers and condensers.

****SHELL EXPANSION PLANS:- shows positions, frame numbers from aft and keel upward,

remove shores/keel blocks in way of damaged areas’.

REPAIR AND DRY-DOCK LISTS

(a) standard items

1.         Hull cleaning, surface preparation, painting

2.         Inspection and overhaul of anchors’ and cables, Including ranging and marking

3.         Inspection cleaning and painting of cable lockers

4.         Pugs to be taken from all bottom and peak tanks (the plugs to be labelled and retained by the chiefofficer and replaced before the dock is flooded)

5.         All sea valves and sea chests to be inspected overhauled and painted

6.         Inspection and overhaul and load test of all lifting appliances

7.         All tanks holds compartments and their closing appliance to be inspected and overhauled

8.         Inspection overhaul and load test of all lifting appliances

9.         All anodes to be inspected the location and weight or size to be ascertained

10.       Survey of ship’s bottom (known as sighting the bottom) to be conducted.

(b) repair items

1.         Renewal of piping

2.         Cargohandling equipment

3.         Hatch-closing arrangements

4.         Bulkhead leaks

5.         Hull structure damage

6.         Replacement of ships side rails

7.         Instrumentation and control equipment refurbishing

8.         Electric cables

9.         Heavy weather damage

10.       Overhaul of fire fighting and life saving appliance

(c) modification items

1.         Fire fighting systems such as foam or carbon dioxide

2.         Fire detection system

3.         New piping and structural arrangements (e.g. Segregated ballast system)

4.         Inert gas systems

5.         Life-saving appliances arrangements

6.         Conversions or restructuring in order to comply with any new mandatory equipment

requirements

LOGBOOK ENTRIES

entering

1.         Time stem clears gates (gates closed)

2.         Pumping commenced

3.         Lines ashore forward and aft

4.         Time of touching the blocks

5.         Time all SEWN on blocks

6.         Time gangway walkable

7.         Vessel certified gas free

8.         Dock draining completed

9.         Note details of special shores/blocks

10.       Utilities connected

coming out

1.         Time flodding commenced (to be after the time of signing the “Authority to Flood”

certificate)

DRY-DOCK PERIOD :- NORMALLY DOCKED EVERY 2 YEARS

V DOCKING WITH CARGO ON BOARD :- CARGO PLAN REQUIRED, ADI)ITIONAL

SHORES/BLOCKS PLACED UNDER UNSUPPORTED CARGO HOLDS

INSPECTING THE FOREPEAK TANKS ON NEW BUILDING OR BEFORE LEAVING THE DRY DOCK

‘Dangerous Space’ procedures should be observed

1.         Check that no rungs are missing from any ladders

2.         As many welds as possible should be checked

3.         Inspect any protective coating and ensure that areas which are difficult to reach have been adequately covered

4.         If sacrificial anodes have been fitted check the position of anodes agree with the plans and that the anodes are secure

5.         Ensure that the sounding pipe is correctly located and that the striker plate has been fitted (have a sounding rod lowered through the pipe and view it touches the striker plate)

6.         Check that the drain is correctly located and in the position indicated on the plan

7.         Check that the air pipes and filling pipes have been fitted with appropriate plugs

8.         Make sure that all loose equipment and shipyard rubbish Vhas.Vbeen removed

9.         The pumping arrangement should be given a thorough inspection. V V

10.       The chief officer should be present with the surveyor at the ‘Tank Test’. (extension pieces are fitted to the filling pipes and the tank slowly filled until a head of 8 feet or 2.45 m above the top of the tank is obtained. Bulkheads cofferdams watertight seals on the manhole covers and all areas adjacent to the forepeak should be checked for leaks. The water in the tank then should be dropped to the operational level.)

DANGEROUS GOODS

No dangerous good shall be loaded unless the shipper has provided a dangerous good declaration.

The declarations must give

1)         the correct technical name of the goods

2)         the identity of the goods

3)         the UN number if applicable

4)         the class in which the goods belong

In addition the shipper must suply the following written information where appropriate:

1)         the number and type of packages

2)         the gross weight of the consignment

3)         the net weight of the explosive content of class 1 goods

4)         the flash point if 6 1 C or below.

If goods are packed into a container or vehicle the vessel must be given a packing certificate for the container or vehicle.

A stowage plan must be made which gives information noted above and also thef location of where the

goods are stowed.

CLASSES OF IMDG

CLASS 1   Explosives

CLASS 2   Gases compressed; liquefied or dissolved under pressure

2.1 Flammable gases

2.2 Non flammable gases, being compresses, liquefied or dissolved but neither flammable nor poisonous

2.3 Poisonous gases

CLASS 3 Flammable liquids

3.1 Low flash point

3.2 Intermediate flash point

3.3 High flash point

CLASS 4.1 Flammable solids

CLASS 4.2 Substances liable to spontaneous combustion

CLASS 4.3 Substances which in contact with water emit flammable gases

CLASS 5.1 Oxidising substances

CLASS 5.2 Organic peroxides

CLASS 6.1 Poisonous (toxic) substances

CLASS 6.2 Infectious substances

CLASS 7  Radioactive substances

CLASS 8 Corrosives

CLASS 9 Miscellaneous dangerous substances which presto a danger not covered by other             classes

Goods must be áëked in accordance with the IMDG code

MARKING

The following requirement shall be complied with

1.         The package must be clearly marked with the correct technical name of the goods and an

indication must be given as to the dangers which could arise during the transportation of the

goods

2.         The markings must comply with the IMDG code

3.         If the outer material of the package will survive three months immersion the marking must be durable

4.         If the outer material will not survive three months any inner receptacles which will survive three months must be durably marked

5.         If the goods are carried in a container or similar unit, then that unit must have distinctive labels on the exterior which comply with the IMDG code class label system

CARRIAGE OF DANGEROUS GOODS ON BOARD A PASSENGER VESSEL

No explosive can be transported on a ship carrying more than 12 passengers except:

1.         Safety explosives

2.         Any explosive the net weight of which is 10kg or under

3.         Distress signals up to a total weight of 1000 kg

4.         Fireworks which are unlikely to explode violently.

No dangerous goods should be allowed on board any vessel carrying more thn 25 passengers

IMDG CODE

The International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code is published by the IMO in five volumes. The code lays down certain basic principles concerning the transportation of dangerous goods

EMERGENCY PROCEDURES FOR SHIP CARRYING DANGEROUS GOODS

This is an IMO publication which gives information concerning the safety, first aid, and emergency procedures to be followed and action to be taken in the ev.en of an incident involving certain.

dangerous goods.

The Emergency Schedules (EmS) are divided into five sections

1.         Group title with.the emergency schedule number (EmS No)

2.         Special equipment required

3          Energeiey procedures

4.         Emergency action

5.         Firstaid

GENERAL FIRE PRECAUTIONS WHEN CARRYING DANGEROUS GOODS

1.         Reject any damaged or leaking packages

2.         Packages should be stowed in a location which ensures protection from accidental damage or heating

3.         Combustible material should be kept awayfrom ignition sources

4.         Goods must be segregated from substances liable to start or to spread fires

5.         It may be necessary to ensure accessibility of dangerous goods so that packages in the vicinity of a fire may be protected or moved to safety

6.         Enforce prohibition of smoking in dangerous areas

7.         Post ‘No Smoking’ signs or symbols

8.         All electrical fittings and cables must be in good condition and safe guarded against short

circuits and sparking

9.         All ventilators must have spark arrestors of suitable wire mesh

PREPARATION WHEN PROCEEDING TO A DISTRESS

1.         Prepare hospital to receive casualties

2.         Plot rendezvous position and possible search pattern.

3.         Stand by communication officer and establish communication

4.         Pass own position and details with relevant search and rescue operation update to RCC

5.         Prepare rescue boat and emergency crew

6.         Obtain current weather situation

7.         Highlight navigational dangers to own ship

8.         Maintain own ship at operational status

9.         Navigate on rnanual steering

10.       Obtain update on target information.

11.       Note activities in log book

12.       Maintain internal and external communication

13.       Brief operational personnel’s. (OOW, boat coxswain)

14.       Rig ‘Guest Wrap’

15.       Plot position and prevailing currents estimate drift

16.       Post look-outs high as area is entered.

17.       Provide information to.engine room advice on standby manoeuvring speed

18.       Radar operational at various ranges, long range scanning and plotting on going

19.       Advise owners agents and reschedule ETA

20.       Update RCC/MRCC

ANCHOR PLAN

1.         Position of anchoring defined

2.         Depth of water and amount of cable

3.         State of tide HW/LW, rise of tide

4.         Type of holding ground

5.         Prevailing weather and shelter

6.         Underwater obstructions

7.         Rate of current

8.         Swinging room from surface objects

9.         Length of time vessel intend to stay

10.       Ships draft and UKC

11.       Use of 1 or 2 anchors

12.       Proximity of other shipping

13.       Local hazards outfalls etc.

14.       Current weather and expected

15.       Position fixing method

16.       Distance from shore by launch

17.       Types of anchors and holding power

18.       Wind direction

19.       Speed of approach

20.       Night or day signals

MANAGEMENT OF OWN VESSEL IN HEAVY WEATHER

1.         Verify vessels position and consider re routeing

2.         Update weather report and plot storm movement

3.         STABILITY:- avoid slack tanks and eliminate free surface

4.         Rig life lines Fwd and Aft•

5.         Warn all departments of heavy weather

6.         Close up deck vents, remove cowls

7.         Check cargo lashing:- heavy lifts, deck cargo, hazardous cargo

8.         Check deck securing, anchors, life-boats, water-tight doors

9.         Secure all derricks and cranes

10.       Batten down all dead lights (steering flat)

11.       Clear all deck olsurplus gear

12.       Slacken of signal and whistle halyards

13.       Remove all awnings

14.       Drain swimming pools

15.       Establish heavy weather work routine

16.       Check securing on accommodation ladder

17.       Secure bridge against – heavy rolling/pitching

18.       Reduce speed in ample time to avoid pounding

19.       Organise meal relief’s and watches

20.       Update position ahd pass to shore station (AMVER)

21.       Free board deck seal check – hatches and tank lids

22.       Reduce manpower on deck work

23.       Final checks on LSA gears – bridge rockets etc.

24.       Note all preparation in the Log Book

25.       Obtain weather predictions and update reports

26.       Engage manual steering in ample time

27.       Revise ETA if appropriate

28.       Adjust ballast tanks to provide optimum trim

HELICOPTER OPERATIONS

HELICOPTER WORKING (PRECAUTIONS)

1.         Do not secure any lines passed down

2.         Do not touch the winch man, stretcher hook/wire until earthed

3.         Do not fire Rockets or line thixwing apparatus in the vicinity of the air craft

4.         Do not transmiton radio when engaged in winching operations

5.         Do not direct strong light towards the helicopter at night

******(AVOTD WASTING TIME AS AVIATION FUEL CAPACITY IS LIMITED)******

HELICOPTER OPERATION (NAVIGATIONAL REQUIREMENT)

1.         Alter course towards rendezvous position

2.         Prepare deck reception

3.         Establish communication with aircraft

4.         Display correct navigational sign (RAM)

5.         Continually monitor own ships position and other traffic

ENGAGEMENTS

1.         Course altered to pilots instrution

2.         Maintain maximum manoeuvring speed

3.         Clear navigational obstructions and obtain sea room

4.         Display wind indicator

5.         Engage manual steering

6.         Log all activities

HIGH LINE OPERATION

Employed when

1.         Exposed rigging

2.         Rough seas

3.         Numerous persons

1.         The aircraft will establish a high hover position clear of all obstruction•

2.         The weighted heaving line is passed down and trailed towards the surface vessel

3.         The hoist wire will be lowered once the deck crew have obtained hold of the heaving line

4.         The aircraft vill then transverse back to establish visual contact (stbd side air craft – port side

5. Air crew man descends and deck crew party should heave in on the high line

6. Aircraft maintains station, air crew men organises double hoist transfer from surface craft

PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HELICOPTER OPERATIONS

1.         Ensure thaf allriggings and bstruóithns about the helicopter landing/transfer area are cleared away

2.         Secure and stow away any loose, items which may become caught with the down draught from helicopter rotor blades

3.         Check and ensure communication with the deck controlling officer and between the bridge and helicopter

4.         Muster damage control/fire party close enough to the are of operations as to be available in an emergency

5.         See that the static hook handler is properly equipped

6.         Display wind sock or smoke signal

7. Observe helicopter operations procedures

8. If operating at night ensure adpcjuatc lighting without blinding the helicopter pilot

9. Display proper lights and shapes throughout operation

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