12-08-2016

India allows foreign cruise ships to operate along the coast till 2024

coastal

India has extended by five years an earlier relaxation from a so-called cabotage law granted to foreign-registered cruise lines to operate along the country’s coast.

Only ships registered in India are allowed to ply on local routes for carrying cargo and passengers according to the cabotage rule, which is a sovereign right used to protect the local shipping industry from foreign competition and for the purpose of national security.

In February 2009, to encourage global luxury liners to run cruises in India, the government eased laws that had barred foreign-registered ships from carrying passengers between Indian ports, without a licence from the director general of shipping, India’s maritime regulator. The relaxation is valid for 10 years till February 2019.

A task force on cruise tourism led by tourism secretary had recommended extension of cabotage relaxation beyond February 2019 “for sending a good signal to the cruise community”.

The recommendation of the task force has been examined and the ministry of shipping has decided to relax cabotage restrictions for foreign flag vessels carrying passengers by five years beyond 5 February 2019, according to a statement from the shipping ministry.

The decision comes in the backdrop of an announcement by Genoa, Italy-based Costa Crociere S.p.A and a unit of Carnival Corporation & plc, the world’s largest cruise ship operator, to start a cruise line service from 16 December this year using Mumbai in India’s financial capital as a home port where services begin and end.

Costa Crociere, Italy’s largest travel group and Europe’s top cruise company, which runs cruise service under the brand name Costa Cruises, plans to run a service between Mumbai and Maldives till 18 March 2017 when the cruise season typically ends.

Source: Live Mint 

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