Second Mate Section 5

EMERGENCIES

SUGGESTED ACTION FOLLOWING COLLISION

1. Stop engines and obtain an assessment of the situation. (It may be prudent to maintain a few revolutions on the engines to avoid the other vessel from total flooding and possible sinking when the two vessel separate)
2. Sound the emergency signal and’carry out a head cunt (To check complements for casualties)
3. Shut all watertight doors and fire doors
4. Inform the master as soonas possible
5. Communication officer to standby and obtain weather report and position from chart
6. Inform engine room and all departments
7. Order bilge pumps/ballast pumps to commence pumping if damage is below the waterline
8. Switch on deck lights and not tinder command (NUC) lights and shapes.
9. Muster damage control parties and detail duties
10. Prepare survival crafts ard make ready for immediate launch if the situation demands


CHIEF OFFICERS DUTIES FOLLOWING COLLISION
1. CHECK THE WATER TIGHT INTEGRITY OFTHE SHIP
2. MACHINERY SPACE WET OR DRY
3. HEAD COUNT (FOR CASUALTIES)
4. INVESTIGATE POLLUTION POSSTBILITY
MASTERS LEGAL OBLIGATION
1. STANDBY TO RENDER ASSISTANCE.
2. EXCHANGE INFORMATION WITH MASTER/OFFICER INCHARGE OF THE
OTHER VESSEL (GENERAL PARTICULARS AND PORT OF DEPARTURE
AND DESTINATION)
3. REPORT ACCIDENT TO THE MARINE ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION
BUREAU (MAIB)
4. MAKE AND ENTRY IN THE OFFICIAL LOG BOOK.
EXTERNAL COMMUNICATIONS FOLLOWING EMERGENCY
1. Distress/Urgency signal
2. Exchange information with other vessel.
3. MAIB
4. Company, Owners, Charterers
5. AMVER
6. Coast Gaurd / MRCC
7. Agents (port of refuge)
8. Tugs/Towing
9. Dry Docking
10. Weather reports
BEACHING is defined as taking the ground intentionally
Carried out for TWO reasons

1. To prevent loss of the vessel when damaged below the waterline
2. When it is the intention to refloat after watertight integrity is restored
IDEAL choice for BEACHING
1. Operation should be carried out in daylight
2. Gentle slopping beach
3. Free of rock preferably, sheltered with little or no current
4. No surf action
BEACHING PROCEDURE
1. Take on full ballast before beaching (as this will make the operation of refloating easier)
2. Approach bow first (unless damage is aft, then stern first) at about 90 to the tide
3. Consider letting go the weather anchor first (this would tend to prevent the vessel slewing parallel to the beach)
4. Should the vessel have sustained damage aft then a stern first approach would be desirable. In that case it should be made in the form of a Mediterranean moor, letting go both anchors which may be used to heave the vessel off when the time comes
5. Antislew wires should be used in conjunction with the anchor
6. On taking the ground take on more ballast prevent pounding by driving the vessel on
7. Make a complete sound round all tanks together with a complete sound round the vessels hull to find out depth of water
ANTI POLLUTION MEASURES FOLLOWING EMERGENCY
1. Plug all scuppers
2. Repair damage / leaking areas
3. Pump out/discharge surplus to barges or other vessels.
4. Transfer internally to other tanks
5. Organise dispersant chemicals (prior permission to be obtained from local authorities)
6. Organise an antipollution barrier
7. List/trim vessel to bring damage over water line.
RECOVERY OF A LIFE BOAT IN HEAVY WEATHER
Preparation

1. Secure a wire pendant to an accessible point on the davit arm
2. Care to be taken and ensure that all the materials used are of sufficient-strength to accept the weight of a fully laden-boat
3. The boat falls should be retrieved at deck level and the nylon strop schakled to the linkage of the floating block Hoisting

1. Lower the falls to the boat
2. Attach the nylon strop to the Iiftiig hook on the fore and aft of the boat
3. Lift the boat off the wãtèr and attach the hanging off pendant on top of the nylon strop
on the lifting hook
4. This will transfer the weight off the nylon stop on to the hanging off wire pendant
Transferring of weight

1. This can be only achieved if the hanging off pendant is long enough to reach the
lifting hook when the floating blocks are hard up at the davit head
2. Once this is achieved either cut the strop at the hook or unshackle at the other end
Stowage
1. Continue to walk back on the falls
2. Connect the falls on to the lifting hook
3. Detach the wire pendant at the davit arm and secure boat
4. When lowering the boat next time detach the wire pendant from the lifling hook.
CASTING OFF A BOAT WHEN THE PARENT VESSEL IS MAKING WAY
1. Once the boat falls has been released and the boat is held on the painter push the tiller toward the ships side
2. This action effectively gives the boat a SHEER
3. Keep the painter taut until the boat reaches a point of maximum sheer
4. Then briefly alter the position of the tiller so that the bow cants inwards towards the parent vessel
5. The result of this action will be for the painter to become temporarily slack which will permit its easy slipping
6. Push tiller towards the ship side again and gain sea room
PREPARATION FOR A LOAD LINE SURVEY
1. Check that all access openings at ends of enclosed structures are in good conditions. All dogs, clamps and hinges to be free and well greased. All gaskets and water-tight seals should be crack free. Ensure that the doors open from both sides
2. Check all cargo hatches and access to holds for weather tightness
3. Check the efficiency and securing of portable beams
4. If portable wooden hatch covers are used check that they are in good condition
5. If tarpaulins are used at least two should be provided for each hatch and in good condition
6. Inspect all machinery space opening on exposed deck
7. Check that any manholes and flush scuttles are capable of being made watertight
8. Check that all ventilator openings are provided with efficient wethertight closing appliance
9. All airpipe should be providedwith satisfactory means for closing and opening.
10. Inspect any cargo ports below the freeboard deck and ensure that all of them are watertight
11. Ensure that non return valves on overboard valves are operating in a satisfactory manner
12. Side scuttles and openings below the freeboard deck must have efficient internal watertight deadlights
13. Check that all freeing ports are in satisfatoiy conditions
14. All guard-rails and bulwarks should be satisfactory condition
15. Derust and paint the deck line, loadline marks, load line and the draught mark
MARPOL
SPECIAL AREAS FOR DISCHARGE OF OIL
1. Mediterranean Sea
2. Baltic Sea
3. Black Sea
4. RedSea
5. Persian Gulf
6. Gulf of Aden
7. Antarctic Area
REGULATION 9 (ANNEX I)
CONTROL OF DISCHARGE OF OIL
Any discharge of oil into the sea is prohibited except when the following conditions are satisfied:-
For an oil tanker

1. The tanker is not within a special area
2. The tanker is more than 50 nautical miles from the nearest land
3. The tanker is proceeding en route
4. The instantaneous rate of discharge of oil content does not exceed 30 litres per nautical mile
5. The total quantity of oil discharged into the sea does not exceed for existing tankers 1/15000 of the total quantity of the particular cargo of which the residue formed part and for new tankers 1/30000 of the total quantity of the particular cargo of which the residue formed a part
6. The tanker has in operation an oil discharge monitoring and control system and a slop tank arrangement
From a ship of 400 tons gross tonnage and above other than an oil tanker and from machinery spaces bilge’s excluding pump-room bilge’s of an oil tanker unless mixed with oil cargo residue
1. The ship is not within a special area
2. The ship is proceeding en route
3. The oil content of the effluent without dilution does not exceed 15 parts per million.
4. The ship has in operation a) 400-1000 tons gross tonnage an oil filtering equipment
5. above 1000 tons gross tonnage an oil filtering equipment with arrangements for an alarm

system and for automatically stopping any discharge of oily mixture when the oil content of the effluent exceeds 15 parts per million
OIL RECORD BOOK
Every oil tankerof 150 tons gross tonnage and above and every ship of 400 tons gross tonnage and above other than an oil tanker shall be provided with an Oil Record Book Part I (Machinery Space Operations).

Every oil tanker of 150 tons gross tonnage and above shall be provided with an Oil Record Book Part II (Cargo/Ballast Operations).

The Oil Record Book shall be completed oa each occasion or a tank to tank basis if appropriate whenever any of the following operations take place in the ship:

(a) for machinery space operations (all ships)

1. Ballasting or cleaning of oil fuel tanks
2. Discharge of dirty ballast or cleaning water from tanks
3. Disposal of oily residues
4. Discharge overboard or disposal otherwise of bilge water which has accumulated in machinery space

(b) for cargo/ballast operations (oil tankers)

1. Loading of oil cargo
PREPARATION FOR A CARGO SHIP SAFETY EQUIPMENT SURVEY
1. Inspect all the lifeboat stores and equipment. Overhaul and renew as necessary
2. Inspect the lifeboats pay particular attention to buoyancy material and check that the bottom boards and thwarts are not cracked. Repaint the ship’s name and port of registry
3. Thoroughly over haul davits, winches and blocks and grease all moving parts. Renew or ‘end for end’ the falls
4. When the boats are in water run any lifeboat engines both ahead and astern
5. Check that the inflatable liferafts have been serviced within the last 12 months
6. Inspect the survival craft portable radio equipment
7. Over haul the lifebuoys especially the self ignighting lights and check that they are correctly located
8. Examine the life jackets andcheck they are correctly distributed
9. Check expiry dates of pyrotechnics
10. Test the emergency lighting system
11. Check fire control plans are posted and still legible
12. Test the fire/smoke detection system
13. Test and try out the fire pump including theemergency fire pump
14. Checks fire hoses, nozzles and applicators are in good conditions
15. Test ajid overhaul the fixed firefighting system
16. Overhaul portable and non portable fire extinguishers
17. Confirm that all remote bontrols are operable
18. Overhaul any applicable closing aftangement for ventilators, skylits; doors, funnel spaces and tunnels
19. Overhaul the fireman’s outfit and recharge the compressed air B.A
20. Inspect the pilot ladders, pilot hoists if carried
21. Navigational equipment is also surveyed
***(CARRY OUT CHECKS AS PER THE RECORD OF INSPECTION FORM ON THE BACK OF THE SEQ CERTIFICATE)***

2. Internal transfer of oil cargo during voyage
3. Unloading of oil cargo
4. Baflasting of cargo tanks and dedicated clean ballast tank
5. Cleaning of cargo tanks including crude oil washing
6. Discharge of ballast except from segregated ballast tank
7. Discharge of water from slop tanks
8. Closing of all applicable valves or similar devices after slop tank discharge operations
9. Closing of valves necessary for isolation of dedicated clean ballast tanks from cargo and
stripping lines after slop tank discharge operations
10. Disposal of residues
CARGO RECORD BOOK
Regulation 9 of ANNEX II to MARPOL 73 states that the Cargo Record Book must be completed, on a tank to tank basis, whenever any of the following operations are carried out:

1. Loading
2. Discharging
3. Cargo transfer
4. Transfer of residues to a slop tank
5. Tank cleaning
6. Transfer from slop tank
7. Ballasting of cargo tanks
8. Transfer of dirty ballast water
9. Any permitted discharge into the sea
GARBAGE SPECIAL AREAS
1. Mediterranean Sea
2. Baltic Sea
3. BlackSea
4. RedSea
5. Persian Gulf
6. North Sea
7. Antarctic Area
8. Wider Caribbean
CLASSES OF GARBAGE
1. Plastics
2. Floating dunnage lining and packing material
3. Ground down paper products, rags glass, metal, bottles, crockery, etc.
4. Piper products, rags, glass, metal bottles, crockery, etc.
5. Food Waste
6. Incinerator Ash
GARBAGE IMSPOSAL
OUTSIDE SPECIAL AREAS

No plastics
Floating materials – more than 25 nautical miles
Food, crockery, bottles, rags, meal cans, etc. – more than 12 nautical miles
Food, crockery, etc., comminuted to pass 25 mm screen – more than 3 nautical miles

INSIDE SPECIAL AREA

Food waste – more than 12 nautical miles
IN WIDER CARIBBEAN REGION Food waste comminuted to pass 25 mm screen — more than 3 nautical miles
MASTERS HANDING OVER DOCUMENTS
1. Certificate of Registry (64 shares, 1st Master signs it)
2. Official Log Book (RGS, Name of ship, Port of registry, Official Number, Gross Tonnage, Registered Tonnage, Certificate Number of Master, Owners name and address, Date opened / closed)
3. Safety construction certificate (must have a TYPE TESTED MAGNETIC COMPASS Before issuing this certificate) (VALIDITY -5 YEARS)
4. Safety radio telegraphy certificate (VALIDITY – 1 YEAR)
5. Safety equipment certificate ( VALIDITY – 2 YEARS) (Record of Inspection)
6. Load line certificate (VALIDITY- 5 YEARS)
7. De-Rat exempt certificate (YALIDITY- 6 MONTHS)
8. International Oil Pollution and Prevention (VALIDITY – 5YEARS)
9. Manning certificate
10. Register of lifting appliance and cargo gear
11. Tonnage certificate (Panama/Suez)
12. Anchor and cable certificate
13. Certificate of Iirnitd liability
14. Ships articles
15. Discharge book if held
16. Ships accounts and money
17. Cargo plan & details (Manifest)(hazardous, heavy lifts, valuables):
18. Sea worthy certificate (Passenger vessels) (VALIDITY – 1 YEAR)
19. Crew list and certificate of competency if held
20. Safety Management Certificate
21. Document of Compliance (copy only)

(all in bold required by do when handing over in addition, the ships plans, soundings of all tanks, defect list, parti